Conservation Citizen Science

Reef Cleanups

Weekly Reef Clean Up – JOIN NOW

 

Starting May 2018 – Reef Cleanups Every Friday 7:30 AM check in. Call for Further Details 808 667 0611

Diving with a Purpose: Reef and Ocean Conservation and Citizen Science.

Extended Horizons Conservation Program

 

Make each dive count!!!!

 

While we share with you the underwater world of the Lahaina coastline and educate you about animal behaviors and relationship, about the underwater world in Hawaii, we will also teach you what you can do to help protect our oceans.

Extended Horizons is excited to introduce a new program that focuses on coral reef and ocean conservation. While enjoying amazing dives on Maui’s west coast, we will teach you how to collect data that scientists can use to answer real-world questions and affect policy change.

We offer a 2 dive packages where we will teach certified diver how to make the most of each dive by collecting data as citizen scientists, which are used by the scientific community and policy makers to track the impact humans have on the oceans and create and implement new policies to protect our oceans (e.g., ban on plastic bags, doing away with plastic straws, fishing restrictions). We offer dives that include collecting debris off the seafloor, counting fish, and monitoring coral health

 

Dive Against Debris Specialty

Marine debris is not only unsightly, it’s dangerous to sea life, hazardous to human health, and costly to our economies. Marine animals become entangled in debris, and even mistake it for food – often with fatal results. Divers, swimmers and beach goers can be directly harmed by encounters with marine debris or its toxins.

 

In effort to combat the destructive nature of debris in the oceans we offer the Dive Against Debris Specialty, which allows those interested in conservation the opportunity to get involved and make a difference. Dive Against Debris not only improves the health of the ocean ecosystem, but data collected help inform policy change. To obtain this specialty rating 1 dive is required, in which we will collect debris while exploring the underwater world near Lahaina, Maui. After the dive we will show you how to become a citizen scientist and to use the Project AWARE Dive Against Debris App to report the debris collected which is used to help inform policy change.

 

Sea Turtle Awareness Distinctive Specialty

Sea turtles are threatened both in the water and on land. There are 7 sea turtle species, all of which are considered endangered or critically endangered, and therefore at a high risk of extinction. The top five threats to turtles are fisheries impact, direct take, coastal development, pollution and disease, and global warming. The decline of sea turtles, both as marine and terrestrial animals, impacts the marine as well as beach and dune ecosystems.

The Sea Turtle Awareness Distinctive Specialty teaches divers (and snorkelers) techniques to identify turtles, how to properly record observations, responsible practices when observing sea turtles, and how to promote sea turtle conservation. To obtain this specialty rating 2 dives are required, in which we will (likely) identify and observe sea turtles in their natural habitat, record information about their species, health, habitat, and food source all while exploring the underwater world near Lahaina, Maui.

 

***Note: sea turtles do not have to be seen to achieve the rating.

AWARE Fish Identification Specialty

 

Recreational divers and snorkelers can substantially increase the amount of biodiversity data available to scientists and conservationists by personally being involved with the conservation of marine ecosystems. The AWARE Fish Identification specialty not only teaches divers (and snorkelers) the most common fish families and species in the Hawaiian waters, but also how to collect data that will be used to track the health of a variety of marine ecosystems.

 

To obtain this specialty rating 2 dives are required. You will learn about some fish species found in the Hawaiian Island chain, many of which are endemic, or unique, to Hawai’i’. You will also learn how to easily conduct fish surveying techniques that will provide valuable and important information to researchers and resource managers around the world, while still enjoying your dive experience. Then we will show you how easy it is to input the data collected to be used by scientists and other officials to understand how marine ecosystems change over time.

AWARE Fish Identification Specialty

Recreational divers and snorkelers can substantially increase the amount of biodiversity data available to scientists and conservationists by personally being involved with the conservation of marine ecosystems. The AWARE Fish Identification specialty not only teaches divers (and snorkelers) the most common fish families and species in the Hawaiian waters, but also how to collect data that will be used to track the health of a variety of marine ecosystems.

To obtain this specialty rating 2 dives are required. You will learn about some fish species found in the Hawaiian Island chain, many of which are endemic, or unique, to Hawai’i’. You will also learn how to easily conduct fish surveying techniques that will provide valuable and important information to researchers and resource managers around the world, while still enjoying your dive experience. Then we will show you how easy it is to input the data collected to be used by scientists and other officials to understand how marine ecosystems change over time.

AWARE Shark Conservation Distinctive Specialty

As apex predators, sharks play a crucial role in marine ecosystems. They maintain balance in populations of prey and species and keep the ocean healthy by removing ill or diseased animals. However, shark population around the globe is on the decline with ~33% of all sharks endangered or near endangered. This course will discuss the value of sharks to the marine ecosystem and economies, the causes of declining shark populations, what is missing in shark fishery management and how to dispel misconceptions that may block action to protect sharks.

2 dives are required to obtain this specialty rating. This specialty aims to increase your knowledge about shark conservation issues. The dives will focus on how to assess dive locations for potential hazards and for features that may reduce impacts on sharks both underwater and at the surface. You will also learn to identify observed shark species, identify non-natural injuries to sharks observed (e.g. fishing hooks or lures, fishing line wrapped around their body), identify if sharks are feeding, resting, cruising or laying on the seafloor.

***Note: Sharks do not have to be seen to achieve the rating.

Coral Reef Conservation Specialty

Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems on Earth. While coral reefs cover less than 1% of the Earth’s surface, they are home to 25% of all marine fish species, which includes ~4000 fish species and ~800 types of coral. The Indo-Pacific contains ~92% of the world’s coral reefs, however nearly 50% of the coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean are threatened. Coral reefs are host to spawning and nursery grounds for many fish populations, protect coastal communities from storm surges and erosion from waves, generate millions of jobs for local people in tourism, fishing and recreational activities, and are known as Earth’s “medicine cabinet” because many life-saving antiviral drugs are derived from reef organisms.  It is crucial we preserve these precious ecosystems.

The Coral Reef Conservation Specialty teaches divers (and snorkelers) the importance of coral reef habitats and how to help conserve these vital ecosystems. To obtain this specialty rating 0 dives are required but we strongly urge you to follow the class up with a dive! This educational course will allow you to learn how coral reefs function, why coral reefs are important, the causes of their decline, and how to help preserve this precious ecosystem. You will also learn what to notice so that you may collect and report data on the health of corals as a citizen scientist. This helps scientists learn more about the health and status of coral reefs, and may also help to influence policy changes.

Endemic Hogfish being cleaned

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